ResearchGrants

How Do We Learn To Ignore Irrelevant Information?

Funding Round: 2 2014-2016

We will use behavioral & electrophysiological techniques to explore the neural mechanisms underlying the ability to ignore in typically developing and clinical populations. The results will inform theories of attention and learning as well as interventions designed to help persons with ADHD cope with distraction.

Does Associative Learning Begin Before Birth?

Funding Round: 2 2014-2016

This project combines developmental psychophysiology with experimental neuroscience to produce a testable hypothesis regarding associative learning in the human fetus. The results will inform our understanding of whether fetuses learn in utero and generate new tools for fetal research.

How Does Growing Up Blind Shape Brain and Behavior?

Funding Round: 2 2014-2016

The current project bridges neuroscience, linguistics, and cognitive psychology to explore how blindness shapes the brain using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and language comprehension assessments. By studying the mechanisms of human brain plasticity, the research will lay the basic science groundwork for optimizing brain function.

Can a machine accurately predict how adults articulate words?

Funding Round: 2 2014-2016

Can a machine accurately predict how adults articulate words? Can machine feedback help adults learn how to correctly pronounce sounds in a novel language? Combining theories of language acquisition from cognitive psychology and new machine learning approaches from computer science, our project will develop the first “multi-view” machine model designed to assist human language learning.

Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation in primary progressive aphasia

Funding Round: 1 2013-2015

This project bridged both basic and clinical research to study how spelling interventions coupled with or without electrophysiological stimulation affect brain connectivity and physiology. To answer this question we compared behavioral (language) changes and changes in brain networks and metabolites between two language interventions: one coupled with electrical stimulation of the brain and another by itself.

Defining the genetic basis for individual differences in learning

Funding Round: 1 2013-2015

This project combines human genetic-behavior studies with molecular, cellular and physiological studies in a variety of laboratory models including neuronal cell culture and genetically modified mice.

Cognitive, Neural, & Translational Implications of a New Reading Disorder

Funding Round: 1 2013-2015

The project integrates cognitive, neural, educational, and computational perspectives to achieve a better understanding of reading disorders, and better methods for diagnosis and treatment.

The cognitive timeline: The role of the hippocampus in reducing interference

Funding Round: 1 2013-2015

This project investigated how the brain learns information presented sequentially and protects memories of events that occurred close in time from interference with each other.

Automated skill assessment for individualized training in robotic surgery

Funding Round: 1 2013-2015

This project is a unique interdisciplinary collaboration between investigators based at the Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, WSE, and the Johns Hopkins Minimally Invasive Surgery Training and Innovation Center, SOM. The project builds on our prior research within the “Language of Surgery” project, in which we have developed statistical models to identify surgical gestures and to assess surgical skill.

Visual localization through learning: An information theoretic approach

Funding Round: 1 2013-2015

This project used behavioral methods in perceptual psychology (also called, ‘psychophysics,’) mathematical and computational analysis, and novel implementation of experiments on tablet computers in order to test children.