Scientific American: A Secret Society of Cells Runs Your Brain

06/25/2013

Dr. Dwight Bergles, professor of neuroscience at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is featured in Scientific American MIND Guest Blog discussing research advances in the study of glial cells and the roles they play in the brain.


Image: In this time-lapse photo series, an oligodendrocyte precursor cell moves into position near a site of neural injury.

Dr. Dwight Bergles, professor of neuroscience at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is featured in Scientific American MIND Guest Blog discussing research advances in the study of glial cells and the roles they play in the brain.

"Your neurons are outnumbered. Many of the cells in your brain – in your whole nervous system, in fact – are not neurons, but glia. These busy little cells shape and insulate neural connections, provide vital nutrients for your neurons, regulate many of the automatic processes that keep you alive, and even enable your brain to learn and form memories.
The latest research is revealing that glia are far more active and mysterious than we’d ever suspected. But their journey into the spotlight hasn’t been an easy one."

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